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Your Keto Journey #13 – Tacos don’t have to be in a shell to taste good!

taco plates capture

What’s wrong with going to the grocery store to buy corn hard shells or flour-based tortilla shells for your tacos?

Well, if you are on a Keto diet and want to lose excess weight and belly fat there are things you are going to need to remember.  Learn more in today’s post, including my recipe for tacos without the shell.

What you need to remember is:

  1.  Both corn and wheat are highly genetically altered
  2.  Both corn and wheat and other flours are high in carbohydrates.

Since this is the case you’re also highly likely to experience hunger just a couple hours after you eat them.

Eating these products will also kick you out of the Keto zone.

Keep eating this way and you will gain back the pounds, inches and belly fat that you worked so hard to lose in the first place!

When you eat this way you are pushing yourself to get back on the sugar and carbohydrate roller coaster.  What do I mean by that?

It’s mid afternoon and you start to feel low on energy. You don’t know how you will get by without a sugar drink, a sugar and nut bar, a pastry or one of those specialty coffees that come with a cup sleeve.

Maybe you are starting to feel irritable or tired.  You feel like you’re dragging and exhausted. What are these feelings?

These feelings are real. Your body is screaming at you for more sugar and carbohydrates. And the sugar tantrum won’t stop until you give your body what it wants. The sugar monster has spoken!

You have to learn to say No and then reinforce that No by changing the foods that you eat.

So, how about tacos without the shell?

Let’s begin, shall we?

Tacos without the shell.

Brown 3/4 pound of grass fed beef in a fry pan while you are washing lettuce and chopping your vegetables. This is for two adults, adjust as necessary for children.

  • Season your beef to taste:
  • (using small amounts at first)
  • salt
  • pepper (ground or granulated)
  • “clean“ chili powder
  • Cumin
  • oregano or Italian seasoning
  • onion (powder or granulated)
  • garlic (powder or granulated)
  • you could also try a little paprika (or celery salt or turmeric).

Note: seasonings should always be added slowly and gently until you decide what you like.

It’s also a good idea to pull out your spices and sprinkle some different combinations onto a small plate. Feel free to taste test using a clean fingertip as you mix so you can decide what you like best.

Be free to experiment and enjoy!

Hint: when you come up with a winning combination, you can mix your identified spices together by mixing 1/2 teaspoon or so of each and storing the recipe in an airtight storage container.

After you add the spices, add a half a can of beef broth (about 8 ounces) and 2 tablespoons of tomato paste to the meat.  Simmer for a few minutes until well combined.  Do not use bouillon cubes as most have MSG.  Also check your tomato paste label.  Tomato paste and citric acid should be the only ingredients listed on the label.

For your vegetables, start with freshly washed and dried field greens of your choice. (hint: the darker green the better).

Add cut up vegetables:

  • avocado
  • onion
  • tomato
  • green pepper
  • onion
  • jalapeños
  • You can also be adventurous and try: riced cauliflower/broccolini or small chopped pieces of broccoli.

To plate, start with the field green lettuce as a base.

Add your vegetables.

Add your seasoned beef.

Top generously with your favorite shredded cheese (not the fat free versions!)

Add a good dollop or two of sour cream and enjoy!

 

As always, be willing to try new ideas. Experiment freely. Be flexible to incorporate suggestions from family members around the table.

And most importantly, encourage children or spouse who are interested in cooking and experimentation to join you.

Many hands make the work go fast and you can have fun working side-by-side.

Scroll down and leave a comment.

Good, bad, ugly, share your experiences- leave a comment or suggest a change.

Most important, enjoy yourself and others as you cook!

Share this blog post with someone you love and care about!

I’m here for you.

Good Day, Good Week and Good Health to You All!

Kat Heil

 

Copyright

© 2018 Kat Heil 2018 Kat Heil, LLC

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